A'S Game - Come join the fun!

Sunday Sept 7th at 1:05pm A's baseball game "CrossFit Day" at the stadium.
Tickets $22
WOD before the game that we get to watch including Neal Maddox, Wes Piatt, Gabe Subry, Margaux Alvarez, Chyna Cho, Ben Alderman, and our own Miranda Oldroyd, and Camille Leblanc. The wod will start at 10am.
If our gym has one of top 20 most people attending, we get to pick a person to compete in the wod with them.
Redwood City and Mtn View already have over 40 people signed up amongst the two gyms.
Money must be collected by noon THIS FRIDAY.
EMAIL SAM samstarlin@hotmail.com if you are interested!

LABOUR DAY SCHEDULE: Each gym will have a noon class ONLY! Sat/Sun schedule as usual.

Schedule Change at RWC - NEW Class Times! Starts Sept 2nd!

Monday - Thursday  4pm, 5pm, 6pm and 7pm and Prep Course at 6pm.

Friday 4pm, 5pm, 6pm. 

Additional 6pm Class starting at Santa Clara on 2nd September (Mon-Thurs)!

Summer Wrap up Challenge!

HERE are your teams!

More Challenge info HERE

Even MORE info HERE

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 


Posted on May 23, 2014


NorCal CrossFit May. 24th 2014

MEMORIAL DAY SCHEDULE

Saturday and Sunday: Schedule as usual all gyms

Monday: ALL Gyms will have a NOON class only on Monday 24th May.

Coaches Megan and Denicia repping the Sweet new NC Coaches Tees!

I get a lot of questions from members about how much protein to eat. Typically, a good starting point is to follow the Zone Diet, but for some people, this might not be the best option. I think it’s important to try different things, think of your body as a lab where you run experiments to see what works well for you to feel your best and perform most optimally.

This is an interesting article I came across from Chris Kresser. It offers an interesting take on protein. Perhaps it will apply to you.

5 Reasons You May Need More Protein—Even on a Paleo Diet

Most people naturally eat the right amount of protein for their needs. Protein is such a crucial nutrient that the brain has specific mechanisms that increase your desire for it if you need more and decrease your desire for it if you’re getting too much; these mechanisms are difficult to override through willpower alone. For this reason, my general recommendation is to simply eat as much protein as you crave.

In the US, this typically averages about fifteen percent of the total calories consumed each day (roughly 113 grams for an active male eating 3,000 calories, or 83 grams for an active female consuming 2,200 calories).

However, there are certain situations where it may be advantageous to increase protein intake to 20 to 30 percent of calories, or even as high as 35 percent of total calories—at least temporarily.

“Wait a second,” you might say. “Don’t high-protein diets cause kidney disease and cancer?” This is yet another urban myth. Studies have shown that protein intakes up to 35 percent of calories (or even higher) are safe for people without pre-existing kidney problems—especially if you make sure to get enough glycine in your diet. And there’s no evidence that high protein diets increase the risk of cancer, as long as you’re eating a balanced, nutrient-dense diet. For more information, read this recent article I wrote on the topic.

Now let’s take a closer look at five groups of people that often benefit from a higher protein intake.

5 groups of people that may benefit from a higher protein intake

People trying to lose weight

A large body of evidence suggests that high protein diets are effective for fat loss. (1) Protein is more satiating than fat and carbohydrate, which means we feel more satisfied when we eat it. (2) When we feel more satisfied, we naturally eat less—and lose weight without trying.

For example, researchers put a group of overweight volunteers into an environment where food intake could be controlled precisely. After increasing their protein intake from 15 percent of calories to 30 percent, study participants consumed about 440 fewer calories per day, and lost an average of 11 pounds over 12 weeks. They did this without counting calories or intentionally eating less. (3; Hat tip to Dr. Stephan Guyenet for this study.)

In fact, some recent research suggests that the reason low-carb diets are effective for weight loss is not because they are low in carbohydrate, but because they are high in protein. (4)

People with blood sugar and metabolic problems

High-protein diets have also been shown to have a stabilizing effect on blood sugar, and lead to beneficial changes in a wide range of metabolic, cardiovascular and inflammatory markers, from insulin sensitivity to cholesterol and triglycerides to C-reactive protein. (56)

Athletes and people who train hard

Protein is the nutrient required to build and rebuild muscle. If you want to add or maintain muscle mass (i.e. if you’re an endurance athlete, weightlifter, CrossFitter, or you train hard in other activities or sports), you should consume more protein.

Extra protein can be especially beneficial after a hard workout or training session, as most of you who are training hard already know.

The elderly and the chronically ill

Both the elderly and the chronically ill frequently suffer from muscle wasting. A higher protein diet can help to prevent further tissue breakdown and reduce the adverse effects of both aging and chronic illness.

People who are under a lot of stress

As I mentioned above, protein has a stabilizing effect on blood sugar. High stress levels can lead to hypoglycemia or other blood sugar imbalances. Increasing protein intake—especially in the morning—can boost energy levels, reduce jitteriness, agitation and mood swings, improve sleep, and sharpen brain function. I’ve seen this repeatedly in my work with patients.

If you’re chronically stressed, the tissues in your body literally start to break down. Stress researchers call this “wear and tear” on the body allostatic load. (7) The tissue breakdown is caused in part by collagen proteins being used up faster than they are replaced. So, if you’re under a lot of stress, it’s especially important to eat proteins that contain collagen.

How much protein do you need?

If you’re in one of the groups above, I recommend consuming between 20 and 35 percent of calories from protein each day. The higher end of that scale (30–35 percent) would be for aggressive weight loss, metabolic problems, and people doing extreme training; the middle end (25–30 percent) for athletes and people training at moderate to vigorous intensity, and the lower end (20–25 percent) for the elderly, chronically ill, and people under a lot of stress. That said, these are just general guidelines and I suggest you experiment through the entire range to see what works best for you.

This is quite possibly much more protein than you’re eating now, even if you’re following  a Paleo-type diet. Let’s look at some examples using the ranges below:

% of calories as protein     

2,200 calorie diet (g)     

3,000 calorie diet (g)

35%

193

263

30%

165

225

25%

138

188

20%

110

150

Now, let’s look at a typical day’s worth of protein on a Paleo diet.

 

Breakfast: two eggs, sauerkraut, steamed vegetables. Approximately 15 grams.

 

Lunch: salad with 3–6 ounces of sliced chicken breast. Approximately 30–60 grams.

 

Snack: one ounce of almonds (about 23 almonds). Approximately 6 grams.

 

Dinner: 1/4–1/2 pound of beef sirloin, sweet potato, steamed broccoli. Approximately 35–70 grams.

 

This adds up to between 86 and 151 grams of protein, or 16–27 percent of calories on a 2,200 calorie diet and 11–20 percent of calories on a 3,000 calorie diet.

As you can see, this falls short of the protein targets for most categories in the table above, especially if you’re eating closer to 3,000 calories and/or trying to get more than 25 percent of calories from protein.

When protein powder makes sense

Obviously one option is to simply increase your intake of whole-food proteins, such as meat, fish, eggs, and nuts (though it’s worth pointing out that the protein in nuts is not as readily absorbed as animal proteins). For example, you could start your day with 1/2 fillet of salmon (about 40 grams of protein) instead of two eggs, and/or you could eat closer to a pound of protein for lunch and dinner.

But let’s face it: not everyone wants to eat over two pounds of fish, meat and poultry each day. I love animal protein myself, and I feel better with a higher protein intake, but even I get tired of eating so much of it so frequently. I have a lot of patients—both male and female—that feel the same way.

This is where protein powder can be a useful addition. You can add a protein shake in between your meals (or in place of breakfast, perhaps) to boost your overall protein intake. Depending on how you make the shake (i.e. simply mixed with water, or mixed with fruit, avocados, egg yolks, etc.), it can either be a source of additional calories if you’re trying to put on weight or aid recovery, or a means of boosting protein without adding calories if you’re trying to maximize weight loss or metabolic function.

There are three important factors in choosing a protein powder: tolerability, quality, and bioavailability.

Tolerability refers to how likely the protein is to cause an adverse reaction. Whey protein is a great choice for many people, but I’ve noticed that quite a few of my patients don’t tolerate it well. I don’t either, despite the fact that I don’t have an issue with dairy products in general. I tend to feel somewhat bloated after consuming whey protein.

Quality refers to the quality of the protein source, how it is processed, and how it is manufactured. There’s obviously a ton of junk out there, especially in the bodybuilding community. If you’re going to use a protein powder, you should choose the highest quality product you can get.

Bioavailability refers to how completely absorbed the protein is. In general, plant proteins like pea and rice are much less bioavailable than animal proteins like whey, egg and beef. 

This is just some FOOD for thought (pun intended). Remember, you are your own lab. Find out what works best for you, and stick with it.

 

WORKOUT FOR  SATURDAY

In teams of Two:

50m Prowler Push (heavy)

40 thrusters (95/65lbs)

40 Pullups

AMRAP 15min

* Only one person can be working at a time.

* scale as needed

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A'S Game - Come join the fun!

Sunday Sept 7th at 1:05pm A's baseball game "CrossFit Day" at the stadium.
Tickets $22
WOD before the game that we get to watch including Neal Maddox, Wes Piatt, Gabe Subry, Margaux Alvarez, Chyna Cho, Ben Alderman, and our own Miranda Oldroyd, and Camille Leblanc. The wod will start at 10am.
If our gym has one of top 20 most people attending, we get to pick a person to compete in the wod with them.
Redwood City and Mtn View already have over 40 people signed up amongst the two gyms.
Money must be collected by noon THIS FRIDAY.
EMAIL SAM samstarlin@hotmail.com if you are interested!

LABOUR DAY SCHEDULE: Each gym will have a noon class ONLY! Sat/Sun schedule as usual.

Schedule Change at RWC - NEW Class Times! Starts Sept 2nd!

Monday - Thursday  4pm, 5pm, 6pm and 7pm and Prep Course at 6pm.

Friday 4pm, 5pm, 6pm. 

Additional 6pm Class starting at Santa Clara on 2nd September (Mon-Thurs)!

Summer Wrap up Challenge!

HERE are your teams!

More Challenge info HERE

Even MORE info HERE